Akalet

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The Akalet Calendar

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The year is Okana Dâlu 2643 Genu Akaleto (OD 2643 GA)

The Akalet Calendar is a lunisolar calendar, it tracks both the phases of the the moons and seasonal movement of the sun. The beginning new month in the Akalet calendar is defined as the first night that the primary moon (7eza) is visible after the dark of the moon. The year is based on the winter solstice.

In its simplest, ancient form, every month of the calendar begins on whatever day the new moon is actually seen or guessed to be first visible, however long that happens to be and the new year begins at the first new moon near or after the winter solstice.

In the current day, instead of basing the new year on observation of the winter solstice, most people observe a standardized pattern in which each year has 13 months, except every 8 years when there are only 12 months. However, many rural communities still begin the month whenever they actually observe the first new moon.

In the most fully standardized form of the Akalet Calendar most years consist of 13 months, in which the 2nd, 4th, 10th, and 12th months have 37 days, and the rest have 36 days. Every 8 years, the last (13th) month of the year is dropped. Additionally every 3 years, in a cycle running parallel and independent of the 8-year cycle, an extra day is added to the 7th month of the year. This gives four possible lengths in days of the year repeating on a 24-year cycle. In every set of 24 years there 14 years with 472 days, 7 years with 473 days, 2 years with 436 days and 1 year with 437 days.

Month #

Month Name

# of Days  

Month #

Month Name

# of Days

1

Dâkath

36

7

Cheln

36/(37)

2

Goru'is

37

8

Samana

36

3

Kala

36

9

Ekas

36

4

Obusin

37

10

Olkas

37

5

Lenash

36

11

Gêcha

36

6

7atta

36

12

Tolas

37

(13)

Ave'an

36


Each year of the 8-year cycle is named, with the three repetitions of that named year in the 24-year cycle being distinguished as Honket ("first"), Âdhes ("second"), and Dâlu ("long"). For different named years, the Dâlu can come before, between, or after Honket and Âdhes.

Year #

Year Name

# of Months # of Days  

Year #

Year Name

# of Months # of Days  

Year #

Year Name

# of Months # of Days
1 Lomas Honket 13 472 9 Lomas Dâlu 13 473 17 Lomas Âdhes 13 472
2 Shuna Honket 13 472 10 Shuna Âdhes 13 472 18 Shuna Dâlu 13 473
3 Okana Dâlu 13 473 11 Okana Honket 13 472 19 Okana Âdhes 13 472
4 Dhoru Honket 13 472 12 Dhoru Dâlu 13 473 20 Dhoru Âdhes 13 472
5 Shilan Honket 13 472 13 Shilan Âdhes 13 472 21 Shilan Dâlu 13 473
6 Edilta Dâlu 13 473 14 Edilta Honket 13 472 22 Edilta Âdhes 13 472
7 Toras Honket 13 472 15 Toras Dâlu 13 473 23 Toras Âdhes 13 472
8 Kêchat Honket 12 436 16 Kêchat Âdhes 12 436 24 Kêchat Dâlu 12 437

Since this system causes the actual new moon to drift later than predict at a rate of one day per 227 years, and the actual winter solstice to accumulate one day of error per 103 years, there are two larger intercalary cycles. Every ninth 24-year cycle (every 216 years) the extra day is not added to the last year of the cycle, so Long Kêchat is called Third Kêchat instead and has the standard Kêchat 436 days.

But every 84 24-year cycles (every 12th time Third Kêchat should occur), not only is the extra day is added back in, Kêchat is also made a 13 month year, giving it the standard 473 days of a Long year.

This system of intercalation keeps the calendar accurate on the scale of ten thousand of years.

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